Ideas for Sharing Ideas


Ideas for Sharing Ideas

    • The overall environment of your center and the climate of individual classes should reflect a spirit of collaboration and sharing, with kids' work hanging on the walls, seating around tables to encourage interaction and other cues reflecting your core values.
    • Always show kids lots of books, magazines or anything else related to a project you're about to undertake to serve as models and idea generators. Get them used to looking at the world for inspiration.
    • Encourage kids to communicate with each while they are working on projects. Model a spirit of inquiry that encourages asking questions.
    • Watch your kids to see who's shy about sharing and encourage them. Pull them out as assistants and ask them questions.
    • Structure all projects so kids work in pairs or small teams. Except for more complicated projects like creating a video, four people is usually the largest effective size for a team. With larger teams, at least one kid will tend to tune out.
    • Follow a pair-share model whenever you can, especially when introducing new projects and activities and at significant new stages of ongoing projects.
    • Use group mapping activities for brainstorming in the early stages of a new project. Be sure to encourage all kids to participate, not just those who are most verbal.
    • Use journals at every opportunity. If you value journals, kids will become proud of them and look forward to showing off their work. Group journals get kids used to working collectively on even small projects as a matter of habit. Use the pair-share technique with every journal activity.
    • Encourage peer experts in your classes. For example, if kids are working on a photo-editing project and you see that one or two have discovered Photoshop filters or some other advanced feature, ask the class, "How many of you have tried the filters?" When those kids raise their hands, point them out to the group by saying something like, "These are your filter experts."
    • Use community-building exercises frequently to help kids become more comfortable with each other.
    • Unless you're under strict time pressures or have very short sessions, try to leave five to 10 minutes at the end of every day for reflection and discussion. These kinds ofeveryday activities are important.
    • Always have a group share or other method of sharing projects once they've been completed. For inquiry-based projects, for example, be sure to include a reporting phase in which kids describe what they've learned.

Youth Learn Org * Technics for sharing ideas 
http://www.youthlearn.org/learning/teaching/collaboration/techniques-sharing-ideas/techniques-sharing-ideas


Aprende idiomas leyendo periodicos y revistas * When you learn English, you have to learn in whole sentences and in context * Learn languages by reading newspapers and magazines - When you learn English, you have to learn in whole sentences and in context. * Imprime diariamente de 10 a 40 renglones de algún texto o noticia interesante o curiosa en tu idioma. Subraya de 10 a 40 palabras (según tu disponibilidad). Anótalas en columna en el espacio disponible abajo del texto o en el reverso de la hoja. Tradúcelas al inglés u otro idioma deseado. Anota el significado al lado de cada palabra. Si ya entiendes lo que lees al 50% en un idioma extranjero, repite lo anterior pero ahora con oraciones cortas (en lugar de palabras) en el idioma extranjero que ya conoces. Revisa tu trabajo y compáralo con el de otros compañeros para corregir errores. Muestra tu trabajo a tu profesor. Pídele que te sugiera otra actividad que expanda lo que acabas de realizar. Copia y comparte este trabajo, súbelo a tu blog o página personal. My Homework Network * Non-Profit Sharing Ring * Languages * Collaborative School Projects * Prof JML * Mexico

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